Ownership of Buckthorn Blaster™ Invasive Plant Management Tool Transfers from Landscape Restoration, Inc., to the North American Invasive Species Management Association

 

Milwaukee, WI (April 27, 2021)—The North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) has taken over ownership of the Buckthorn Blaster™, a specialty tool used to apply herbicide to freshly cut stumps and stems. The tool was formerly owned and distributed by Landscape Restoration, Inc., a Minnesota company with a mission to “instill in others a passionate desire to preserve and restore native woodland habitat and plant communities.”

Cheryl Culbreth, founder of Landscape Restoration, Inc., is an experienced woodland restoration contractor, speaker, educator and private landowner. “I am delighted that NAISMA has taken over sales and marketing of the Buckthorn Blaster™ product line,” Culbreth says. “NAISMA’s broad reach and invasive species management mission provides a wonderful new home for the Buckthorn Blaster™.”

The Buckthorn Blaster™ joins dozens of other products in NAISMA’s online store, which supports  the prevention and management needs of invasive species outreach specialists, educators and managers. The handheld tool is used by professional invasive species managers, trained volunteers, and private landowners to paint herbicide on the cut stems of unwanted plants in a more precise, strategic way that limits chemical use, prevents hazardous spills or ‘drift’ from airborne herbicide spraying, and reduces the likelihood of resprouting —a common challenge in many aggressive, woody species.

“Cheryl developed this tool to be helpful for a variety of users. The Buckthorn Blaster should be in everyone’s toolbox, and NAISMA is very honored to be the steward of this great tool,” says Belle Bergner, executive director of NAISMA. She adds that invasive species management has become a responsibility of all land and water managers to protect North America’s natural ecosystems including threatened and endangered species.

The Buckthorn Blaster™ is available at https://naisma.org/shop/buckthornblasterproducts/ for $6.99. Accessories and replacement parts are also available. NAISMA members receive 10% off, and all profits from NAISMA store sales directly support the organization’s trainings, standards, and programs that are provided for the invasive species management community.

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The North American Invasive Species Management Association (NAISMA) is a network of professionals challenged by invasive species: land managers, water resource managers, state, regional, and federal agency directors and staff, researchers, and nonprofit organizations. The mission of NAISMA is to support, promote, and empower invasive species prevention and management in North America. NAISMA’s members are a diverse group of individuals and organizations who are involved in implementing invasive species management programs at all scales. Its programs aim to provide the support, training, and standards needed by the professional invasive species management community. For more information, visit NAISMA.org.

 

Click here to see full article.

 

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Landscaping with Native Plants – Free Webinar Link

Landscaping with Native Plants Webinar Series, Cheryl Culbreth – Speaker

sponsored by

Minnesota Women’s Woodland Network (MNWWN)

and

Minnesota State Horticultural Society (MSHS)

Cheryl Culbreth, Speaker

 

 

MSHS Webinar on 4/2/20, “Landscaping with Native Plants” link:

 

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/7246804578833776396

 

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Garlic Mustard Control by Cheryl Culbreth, Landscape Restoration, Inc.

Garlic mustard is the bane of my existence. I have often said I will take 100 acres of buckthorn over one acre of garlic mustard. My field experience, and interactions with  landowners, has shown that options beyond hand-pulling exist to control garlic mustard. And let’s make sure it is non-native garlic mustard (Alliara petiolata) being pulled versus a valuable native plant. Everything you want to know about controlling garlic mustard is available from the Minnesota State Horticultural Society (“MSHS”), which recorded my most recent garlic mustard workshop at the link below. The small fee of $8.00 is shared by MSHS and the Minnesota Women’s Woodland Network, both non-profit organizations. My time to create and present this webinar was donated and none of the proceeds are mine. I am just crazy passionate about educating landowners who want to restore the native habitat on their property for the benefit of wildlife and our planet. If you have follow up questions or comments, please contact me at cheryl@landscape-restoration.com. Thanks and enjoy the webinar!!

Garlic Mustard – Get Rid of It Webinar

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Landscape Restoration Inc Facebook Page

Please follow Landscape Restoration Inc on Facebook for events, posts and links related to native habitat restoration. Our Facebook link: https://www.facebook.com/LandscapeRestorationMN

Posted in annual native woodland plant, Biological control of garlic mustard, Buckthorn Berry Characteristics, Buckthorn Control, Buckthorn Control Methods, Buckthorn Identification, Buckthorn Replacement Plants, Garlic Mustard, Habitat Restoration, Invasive Species, Native Plant Species, Native Woodland Plants, Non native invasive plants | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Winter Plant Identification

minnesota-lady-slipper

Lady Slipper

Walking through our woods to practice tree & shrub bud ID several winters ago, I became curious about the dried up plants I spotted. Laziness was my real motivator. If I knew which plants were the “bad chaps”, I could bag and destroy their seed heads in winter and avoid the bigger job of dealing with an explosion of nasty  germinating weeds come spring and summer. Thus began my continuing journey of winter plant identification.

Not many really good books on winter plant ID seemed to be available when I was in the market. The books I came across included a limited number of species from our area in the Midwest. Nonetheless, I purchased two different books with hand sketches to get me started.

As a visual learner, I decided to take my own photos and then document the genus and species of each new native and non-native plant I was able to identify. Being a plant sleuth is a great way to learn species ID.

Cheryl Culbreth
Landscape-Restoration.com

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Buckthorn Workshop in Faribault at RBNC on 4-1-14

For anyone in SE Minnesota interested in control of buckthorn and other non-native plants plan on joining me at River Bend Nature Center in Faribault on the evening of April 1, 2014 for their Lectures in Nature series. I will be discussing management of buckthorn and other non-native invasive species as the first step to restore native woodland plant habitat. See details in the flyer below and be sure to pre-register through River Bend Nature Center in Faribault at rbnc.org or call 507-332-7151.

Buckthorn Blaster herbicide applicators and related products will be available for sale at this event.
RBNC Buckthorn Lecture 4-1-14 001

Posted in Buckthorn Control, Buckthorn Control Methods, Buckthorn Identification, Buckthorn Replacement Plants, Cut-stump buckthorn removal method, Habitat Restoration, How to Identify Buckthorn in Your Woodland, Invasive Species, Native Plant Species, Non native invasive plants, Winter Identification of Buckthorn | Tagged , , , , | Comments Off on Buckthorn Workshop in Faribault at RBNC on 4-1-14

Best method to deal with the berries of non-native invasive buckthorn?

In many old-growth buckthorn infestations, buckthorn berries have been dropping for years creating a significant seed bank that will germinate like crazy when the buckthorn canopy is removed and sunlight reaches the woodland understory (see NOTE below). Trying to haul … Continue reading

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Don’t Know – Don’t Plant! How Non-Native Invasive Plants Spread

Years ago my dear sister shared a plant with me that she uprooted her garden. “I don’t know what it is but it’s really pretty when the purple flowers bloom along the stalk”.  So I planted the specimen in my garden, anxious to have a variety of blooming plants for curb appeal. BIG mistake!
Photo of non-native Creeping or European Bellflower by Elizabeth J. Czarapata

Photo of non-native Creeping or European Bellflower by Elizabeth J. Czarapata

To this day I am still finding seedlings of Creeping/European bellflower (Campanula rapunculoides) popping up randomly far from the original planting site.  This non-native bellflower can be distinguished by blossoms that occur along only one side of the flowering stalk. Click on the scientific name above for a link to view detailed facts and photos on the WI DNR website.

Words of caution to garden by, be suspicious of accepting any plants offered for free unless you are 100% certain that you won’t cause the next non-native invasive plant to enter and infest our natural areas.  Well-meaning folks are more than happy to share plants that are growing crazy out of control and this should be your first inking of a potential problem. Do some investigating before planting and take if from me, if you Don’t Know – Don’t Plant!

I appreciated receiving and watching the link that follows. It is a short 3.5 minute video from the NY area sharing how burning bush (aka winged euonymus) may have innocently escaped cultivation and invaded native woodland habitats. Buckthorn, honeysuckle, barberry and many other non-native invasive plants have also infested natural areas across the country in a similar manner.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=puJlpQHHCZA 

Help nature and plant only native, local origin plants on your property.

Cheryl Culbreth
Landscape Restoration, Inc.

Posted in Buckthorn Control, Buckthorn Replacement Plants, Habitat Restoration, Invasive Species, Native Plant Species, Native Woodland Plants, Non native invasive plants | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Another Good Reason to Get Rid of Buckthorn – Maple Syrup

This is the final outcome of our 2013 maple sap harvest:

Maple Syrup 2013

Maple Syrup 2013

Being able to harvest maple syrup is another good reason to control buckthorn in an oak-maple-basswood forest.

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Buckthorn Blasters Products for Sale in Plymouth, MN

The City of Plymouth (MN) is holding their annual Yard & Garden Expo this weekend, April 12 – 13, 2013. This is a really fun event with something for everyone. Get more details at their web site link:

http://www.plymouthmn.gov/index.aspx?page=542&recordid=1702

Be sure to stop by our booth, Landscape Restoration, Inc. to get free advice on controlling buckthorn, garlic mustard and other non-native invasive plants. Learn more about our native plants that are ideal to replace buckthorn. In addition, all of our products will be available for sale including the Buckthorn Blaster ($6) herbicide applicator for cut-stump treatment of buckthorn and other “stemmed” invasives such as honeysuckle, Canada thistle, purple loosestrife, etc., etc.

Our Buckthorn Field ID Guide to assist with identification of native vesus non-native shrubs will be on sale for only $1o. Also available will be Buckthorn Blaster replacement applicator tips, concentrated Mark-It Blue Landscape dye and 18% glyphosate herbicide in a 3-pack of six ounce containers. More information about our buckthorn control products can be found at our website www.landscape-restoration.com, or call Cheryl at 612-590-9395.

Cheryl Culbreth
Landscape Restoration, Inc.

 

Posted in Biological control of garlic mustard, Buckthorn Control, Buckthorn Control Methods, Buckthorn Identification, Buckthorn Replacement Plants, Canada Thistle control, Cut-stump buckthorn removal method, Garlic Mustard, Garlic mustard control options, Habitat Restoration, Invasive Species, Native Plant Species, Non native invasive plants | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment